Nanotechnology

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  • Researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument

    Nanowerk Nanotechnology Research News
    1 May 2015 | 11:22 pm
    The probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scans a surface to reveal details at a resolution 1,000 times greater than that of an optical microscope. That makes AFM the premier tool for analyzing physical features, but it cannot tell scientists anything about chemistry. For that they turn to the mass spectrometer. Now, scientists have combined these cornerstone capabilities into one instrument that can probe a sample in three dimensions and overlay information about the topography of its surface, the atomic-scale mechanical behavior near the surface, and the chemistry at and under the…
  • EDF applauds bipartisan breakthrough on TSCA reform legislation

    EDF Health
    Richard Denison
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:51 pm
    By Richard DenisonRichard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist Environmental Defense Fund applauds the enormous progress announced today by Senators on both sides of the aisle to develop and advance bipartisan legislation to reform our nation’s badly broken 40-year-old chemical safety law, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Today’s announcement is the culmination of two years of tough negotiations led by Senators Tom Udall and David Vitter, who have worked steadfastly to address the concerns of Members and stakeholders. With the agreed-upon changes, the revised bill…
  • Engineering a better solar cell: Research pinpoints defects in popular perovskites

    Nanowerk Nanotechnology Research News
    30 Apr 2015 | 1:40 pm
    A new study demonstrates that perovskite materials, generally believed to be uniform in composition, actually contain flaws that can be engineered to improve solar devices even further.
  • The random raman laser: A new light source for the microcosmos

    Nanowerk Nanotechnology Research News
    4 May 2015 | 6:51 am
    Researchers demonstrate how a narrow-band strobe light source for speckle-free imaging has the potential to reveal microscopic forms of life.
  • Novel superconducting undulator provides first x-ray light at ANKA

    Nanotechnology Now Recent News
    4 May 2015 | 9:28 am
    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide insights into the world of very small structures like microbes, viruses or nanomaterials and rely on dedicated magnet technology, which is optimized to produce...
 
 
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    Nanotechnology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Chemists cook up three atom-thick electronic sheets

    3 May 2015 | 7:11 am
    Making thin films out of semiconducting materials is analogous to how ice grows on a windowpane: When the conditions are just right, the semiconductor grows in flat crystals that slowly fuse together, eventually forming a continuous film. This process of film deposition is common for traditional semiconductors like silicon or gallium arsenide -- the basis of modern electronics -- but scientists are now pushing the limits for how thin they can go. They have demonstrated a way to create a new kind of semiconductor thin film that retains its electrical properties even when it is just atoms…
  • Chemistry, topography and mechanics probed with one instrument

    1 May 2015 | 12:16 pm
    Scientists have combined atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry into one instrument that can probe a polymer sample in three dimensions and overlay information about the topography of its surface, the atomic-scale mechanical behavior of the bulk sample, and subsurface chemistry.
  • A smartphone with ultimate macro feature: DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

    29 Apr 2015 | 8:32 am
    Researchers have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope.
  • Artificial photosynthesis could help make fuels, plastics and medicine

    29 Apr 2015 | 7:48 am
    The global industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total energy used every year. Now scientists are inventing a new artificial photosynthetic system that could one day reduce industry's dependence on fossil fuel-derived energy by powering part of the sector with solar energy and bacteria. The system converts light and carbon dioxide into building blocks for plastics, pharmaceuticals and fuels -- all without electricity.
  • Making robots more human: Wearable sensors read human facial expressions

    29 Apr 2015 | 7:10 am
    Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions -- from smiling and frowning to brow-furrowing and eye-rolling -- to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that can do the same thing. Their technology could help robot developers make their machines more human.
 
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    Nanotechnology News

  • Research seeks alternatives for reducing bacteria in fresh produce using nanoengineering

    4 May 2015 | 5:17 am
    Nearly half of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. from 1998 through 2008 have been attributed to contaminated fresh produce. Prevention and control of bacterial contamination on fresh produce is critical to ensure food safety.
  • (R)evolution

    4 May 2015 | 12:04 am
    Scientist Peter Bernhardt has dedicated his life to nanotechnology, the science of manipulating matter on the atomic scale. As the founder of Biogineers, he is on the cusp of revolutionizing brain therapies with microscopic nanorobots that will make certain degenerative diseases become a thing of the past.
  • Measuring Melittin Uptake into Hydrogel Nanoparticles with...

    3 May 2015 | 12:30 pm
    This paper describes how changes in the refractive index of single hydrogel nanoparticles detected with near-infrared surface plasmon resonance microscopy can be used to monitor the uptake of therapeutic compounds for potential drug delivery applications. As a first example, SPRM is used to measure the specific uptake of the bioactive peptide melittin into N-isopropylacrylamide -based HNPs.
  • Liquid Tunable Nanolaser Developed

    2 May 2015 | 3:19 pm
    Scientists have developed the first liquid nanoscale laser and it's tunable in real time, meaning you can quickly and simply produce different colors, a unique and useful feature. The laser technology could lead to practical applications, such as a new form of a "lab on a chip" for medical diagnostics.The laser's color can be changed in real time when the liquid dye in the microfluidic channel above the laser's cavity is changed.
  • New Study: Nanovis Incorporated - Medical Equipment - Deals and Alliances Profile

    2 May 2015 | 9:05 am
    The company develops tissue regenerating implants for bone and soft tissues. Its products include implant nanosurfaces, implantable scaffolds, injectable biomaterials, nanostructure polymers and anaphase ceramics.
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    the Foresight Institute

  • Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

    Jim Lewis
    3 May 2015 | 5:16 pm
    From the cover of the European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems. A decade ago Foresight participated in a two-year effort to produce the first technology roadmap from current, incremental nanotechnology to productive nanosystems capable of general purpose, high-throughput atomically precise manufacturing (APM). The purpose of roadmaps, such as the well-known and extremely successful International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, is to define the future technology requirements for complex systems so that present-day…
  • Nanothreads formed from smallest possible diamonds

    Jim Lewis
    2 May 2015 | 4:42 pm
    Diamond nanothreads promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental unit of a diamond structure -- zig-zag cyclohexane rings of six carbon atoms bound together, in which each carbon is surrounded by others in the strong triangular-pyramid shape of a tetrahedron. The threads, made for the first time by a team led by John V. Badding of Penn State University, have a structure that has never been seen before.
  • UK SuperSTEM facility advances imaging and analysis of materials

    Jim Lewis
    30 Apr 2015 | 8:07 pm
    SuperSTEM2, a Nion UltraSTEM 100 microscope. Credit: EPSRC In his classic 1959 talk “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom: An Invitation to Enter a New Field of Physics” Richard P. Feynman challenged his fellow physicists to make the electron microscope 100 times better: … It is very easy to answer many of these fundamental biological questions; you just look at the thing! You will see the order of bases in the chain; you will see the structure of the microsome. Unfortunately, the present microscope sees at a scale which is just a bit too crude. Make the microscope…
  • Gold nanotubes engineered for diagnosis and therapy

    Jim Lewis
    30 Apr 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Pulsed near infrared light (shown in red) is shone onto a tumour (shown in white) that is encased in blood vessels. The tumour is imaged by multispectral optoacoustic tomography via the ultrasound emission (shown in blue) from the gold nanotubes. Image credit: Jing Claussen (iThera Medical, Germany) Across a range of applications, the move from limited control of nanostructure toward the goal of eventual atomic precision is providing increased functional capabilities. Foresight President Paul Melnyk sends this example from Medgadget (written by by Joshua Chen) of added benefits from…
  • Foresight Institute Awards Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology to Amanda S. Barnard, Joseph W. Lyding

    Jim Lewis
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:36 pm
    Feynman Prize winners for 2014 Amanda S. Barnard (Theory) and Joseph W. Lyding (Experimental). Palo Alto, CA – April 23, 2015 – Foresight Institute, a leading think tank and public interest organization focused on molecular nanotechnology, announced the winners for the 2014 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes. These prestigious prizes, named in honor of pioneer physicist Richard Feynman, are given in two categories, one for experiment and the other for theory in nanotechnology. Established in 1993, these prizes honor researchers whose recent work has most advanced the achievement…
 
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    TINC's Posts - The International NanoScience Community

  • Structural and morphological studies of manganese-based cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    TINC
    2 May 2015 | 2:42 am
    M. Michalska, L. Lipińska, A. Sikora, D. Ziółkowska, K. P. Korona, M. Andrzejczuk Structural and morphological studies of manganese-based cathode materials for lithium ion batteries Abstract: Nanocrystalline powders: lithium-manganese oxide (LiMn2O4) of spinel and lithium-manganese phosphate (LiMnPO4) of olivine structure were synthesized by a modified sol–gel method. In this synthesizing process, lithium and manganese salts and complexing agent were used as reactants. The obtained powders were characterized by a number of methods: X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron…
  • Catalytic activity of Fe/ZrO2 nanoparticles for dimethyl sulfide oxidation

    TINC
    2 May 2015 | 2:30 am
    Title of the paper: Catalytic activity of Fe/ZrO2 nanoparticles for dimethyl sulfide oxidation Authors: Keshav Chand Soni*, S. Chandra Shekar, Beer Singh, T. Gopi University/Institute:PD Division, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior 474002, India Abstracts: Abstract A low-temperature vapor phase catalytic oxidation of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) with ozone over nano-sized Fe2O3–ZrO2 catalyst is carried out at temperatures of 50–200 ºC. Nanostructured Fe2O3–ZrO2 catalyst (FZN) is prepared by modified sol-gel method using citric acid as a chelating agent and conventional…
  • Open PhD Position - Austrian Research Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB), Austria

    TINC
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    ACIB – the Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology – is one of the leading research competence centres in the field of industrial biotechnology. At the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna, ACIB currently offers a Open PhD Position  Impact of metabolite transport and cellular compartmentalization on metabolic engineering Research field Major goal of this project is the establishment of tools for artificial structural organisation of metabolic pathways, including scaffolds to express enzymes in an organised close proximity and metabolic compartments,…
  • Tenure Track Position in Nanocellulosic Biomaterials and Chemicals - University of Oulu, Finland

    TINC
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:28 am
    The Faculty of Technology at the University of Oulu announces a tenure track position for a researcher studying biomaterials and biochemicals derived from nanocelluloses. The position is located in the research group of Fiber and Particle Engineering. One of the main research focus areas of the group is sustainable fabrication techniques of nanocelluloses and their use as water treatment chemicals and film and composite materials. There are approximately ten people working in this research area within the group. Description of the field of the tenure track position: Research on production…
  • Got production challenges? Find answers at EASTEC

    TINC
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:35 am
    EASTEC - human ingenuity - manufacturing brilliance May 12-14, 2015 Eastern States Exposition West Springfield, Massachusetts REGISTER Exhibitor List Floorplans Keynote Presentations Education Opportunities You’re Facing Tough Challenges…EASTEC Has the Answers Northeast manufacturers are facing new challenges every day…production deadlines, profitability and more. Are you experiencing a surge in demand for the products you sell? Are your production operations in need of updating to meet customer needs? Are you being challenged to design and manufacture your products faster…with…
 
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    EDF Health

  • EDF applauds bipartisan breakthrough on TSCA reform legislation

    Richard Denison
    27 Apr 2015 | 2:51 pm
    By Richard DenisonRichard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist Environmental Defense Fund applauds the enormous progress announced today by Senators on both sides of the aisle to develop and advance bipartisan legislation to reform our nation’s badly broken 40-year-old chemical safety law, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Today’s announcement is the culmination of two years of tough negotiations led by Senators Tom Udall and David Vitter, who have worked steadfastly to address the concerns of Members and stakeholders. With the agreed-upon changes, the revised bill…
  • TSCA reform legislation: Confidential business information

    Richard Denison
    23 Apr 2015 | 8:27 am
    By Richard DenisonRichard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist Part 1              Part 2              Part 3              Part 4 [UPDATE 4-29-15:  On April 28, 2015, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed a revised version of the Lautenberg Act out of the committee on a bipartisan 15-5 vote.  The new bill made a few revisions to a provision discussed in this post; see update below.] This is the fourth in a series of blog posts looking at less talked-about, but critically important, elements of bipartisan legislative proposals…
  • Behind the Label: the Blueprint for Safer Chemicals in the Marketplace

    jpratt
    21 Apr 2015 | 1:06 pm
    By jprattBoma Brown-West is a manager on EDF’s Supply Chain Team within the Corporate Partnerships Program. If you’re in the business of using chemicals to make consumer products – things like shampoo or baby lotions, spray cleaners or laundry soap – the last few years have likely been anything but dull. State legislatures have been passing laws restricting certain chemicals from products; consumers are demanding more transparency about product ingredients; and some of the nation’s biggest retailers, including Walmart and Target, have issued chemical policies of their own. Having…
  • TSCA reform legislation: How chemicals are selected for safety evaluations

    Richard Denison
    20 Apr 2015 | 8:16 am
    By Richard DenisonRichard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist Part 1              Part 2              Part 3              Part 4 [UPDATE 4-29-15:  On April 28, 2015, the Senate Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee passed a revised version of the Lautenberg Act out of the committee on a bipartisan 15-5 vote.  The new bill made a few revisions to provisions discussed in this post; see updates below.] This is the third in a series of blog posts looking at less talked-about, but critically important, elements of bipartisan legislative proposals…
  • TSCA reform legislation: EPA review of new chemicals

    Richard Denison
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:51 am
    By Richard DenisonRichard Denison, Ph.D., is a Lead Senior Scientist Part 1              Part 2              Part 3              Part 4 This is the second in a series of blog posts looking at less talked-about, but critically important, elements of bipartisan legislative proposals to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).  This post deals with EPA authority to review new chemicals prior to their entry into commerce. TSCA divided the universe of chemicals into two groups:  “Existing chemicals” are those on the market at the time the first TSCA…
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    2020 Science

  • A new home for Risk Innovation

    Andrew Maynard
    29 Apr 2015 | 1:04 pm
    Five years ago, I joined the University of Michigan School of Public Health as Director of the U-M Risk Science Center. It's been a good five years. However, last year, the good folks at Arizona State University made me an offer I couldn't refuse - the opportunity to expand substantially my work on risk and innovation, at one of the most exciting and progressive universities in the U.S. The post A new home for Risk Innovation appeared first on 2020 Science.
  • The Poetry of Innovating Responsibly

    Andrew Maynard
    24 Apr 2015 | 10:29 am
    What have technology innovation, haiku, and this summer's blockbuster-in-waiting Jurassic World got in common? The answer: a short book of haiku on responsible technological innovation that a group of colleagues helped put together last summer. The post The Poetry of Innovating Responsibly appeared first on 2020 Science.
  • No New York Times, wearable computers couldn’t be as harmful as cigarettes!

    Andrew Maynard
    18 Mar 2015 | 11:38 am
    I was taken aback- to say the least - by an article from the New York Times that crossed my Twitter feed today that suggested wearable electronics like the new Apple Watch could be has harmful as smoking. I have to wonder whether the author actually read the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monograph on which it's based! The post No New York Times, wearable computers couldn’t be as harmful as cigarettes! appeared first on 2020 Science.
  • Solving public health challenges through innovation

    Andrew Maynard
    16 Mar 2015 | 4:41 pm
    Last Thursday, the second annual University of Michigan Innovation In Action competition concluded, with six stunning student pitches for startups that could make a significant dent on the health and well-being of communities. It was a great example of what can be achieved at the intersection of public health, entrepreneurship, and the creativity and energy that students can bring to real-world problems. The post Solving public health challenges through innovation appeared first on 2020 Science.
  • Dunkin’ Donuts ditches titanium dioxide – but is it actually harmful?

    Andrew Maynard
    12 Mar 2015 | 3:56 am
    In response to pressure from the advocacy group As You Sow, Dunkin’ Brands has announced that it will be removing allegedly “nano” titanium dioxide from Dunkin’ Donuts’ powdered sugar donuts. As You Sow claims there are safety concerns around the use of the material, while Dunkin’ Brands cites concerns over investor confidence. It’s a move that further confirms the food sector’s conservatism over adopting new technologies in the face of public uncertainty. But how justified is it based on what we know about the safety of nanoparticles? Titanium dioxide (which isn’t the same…
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    Soft Machines

  • Does transhumanism matter?

    Richard Jones
    7 Apr 2015 | 9:13 am
    The political scientist Francis Fukuyama once identified transhumanism as the “the world’s most dangerous idea”. Perhaps a handful of bioconservatives share this view, but I suspect few others do. After all, transhumanism is hardly part of the mainstream. It has a few high profile spokesmen, and it has its vociferous adherents on the internet, but that’s not unusual. The wealth, prominence, and technical credibility of some of its sympathisers – drawn from the elite of Silicon Valley – does, though, differentiate transhumanism from the general run of fringe movements. My…
  • Does radical innovation best get done by big firms or little ones?

    Richard Jones
    5 Mar 2015 | 12:56 am
    A recent blogpost by the economist Diane Coyle quoted JK Galbraith as saying in 1952: “The modern industry of a few large firms is an excellent instrument for inducing technical change. It is admirably equipped for financing technical development and for putting it into use. The competition of the competitive world, by contrast, almost completely precludes technical development.” Coyle describes this as “complete nonsense” -“ big firms tend to do incremental innovation, while radical innovation tends to come from small entrants.” This is certainly conventional wisdom…
  • Growth, technological innovation, and the British productivity crisis

    Richard Jones
    28 Jan 2015 | 2:38 pm
    The biggest current issue in the UK’s economic situation is the continuing slump in productivity. It’s this poor productivity performance that underlies slow or no real wage growth, and that also contributes to disappointing government revenues and consequent slow progress reducing the government deficit. Yet the causes of this poor productivity performance are barely discussed, let alone understood. In the long-term, productivity growth is associated with innovation and technological progress – have we stopped being able to innovate? The ONS has recently released a set of…
  • Science, Politics, and the Haldane Principle

    Richard Jones
    5 Jan 2015 | 1:09 pm
    The UK government published a new Science and Innovation Strategy just before Christmas, in circumstances that have led to a certain amount of comment (see, for example, here and here). There’s a lot to be said about this strategy, but here I want to discuss just one aspect – the document’s extended references to the Haldane Principle. This principle is widely believed to define, in UK science policy, a certain separation between politics and science, taking detailed decisions about what science to fund out of the hands of politicians and entrusting them to experts in the Research…
  • Responsible innovation and irresponsible stagnation

    Richard Jones
    16 Nov 2014 | 12:05 pm
    This long blogpost is based on a lecture I gave at UCL a couple of weeks ago, for which you can download the overheads here. It’s a bit of a rough cut but I wanted to write it down while it was fresh in my mind. People talk about innovation now in two, contradictory, ways. The prevailing view is that innovation is accelerating. In everyday life, the speed with which our electronic gadgets become outdated seems to provide supporting evidence for this view, which, taken to the extreme, leads to the view of Kurzweil and his followers that we are approaching a technological singularity.
 
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    Next Big Future

  • 150 kilowatt Solid State combat laser is ready this year

    4 May 2015 | 12:01 am
    The General Atomics 150-kw Hellads (high energy laser) will be tested this summer at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico The third generation solid state laser is to be demonstrated in 2018 on the USS Paul Foster, a decommissioned Spruance-class destroyer that now serves as the U.S. Navy’s ship-defense test vessel at Port Hueneme in California.The Gen 3 (third generation laser) has increased electrical-to-optical efficiency, improved beam quality and further reduced size and weight.The module includes high-power-density lithium-ion batteries, liquid cooling for the laser and batteries,…
  • US Navy Ground Based Combat Laser

    3 May 2015 | 11:23 pm
    The Ground-Based Air Defense On-the-Move is a vehicle-based, mobile, high-energy laser that is a cost-effective defense against asymmetric threats like UAVs. GBAD's evolution has mirrored that of other directed-energy programs sponsored by ONR, including the Laser Weapon System (LaWS).A three vehicle laser system should be demoed with on the move downing of drones using a 30 kilowatt laser in 2017.* one vehicle has the 30 kw laser* one has 360 radar and tracking* one has command and control and communicationThe volumetric search RADAR locates unmanned aerial system (UAS) targets of…
  • Making viable hypersonic commercial airplane designs including a Mach 8 cruise passenger vehicle

    2 May 2015 | 6:36 pm
    HEXAFLY aims to create a multi-disciplinary platform where several breakthrough technologies can be mounted on board for testing in free flight at high speed. This approach will create the basis to increase gradually the Technology Readiness Level (TRL).The emerging technologies and breakthrough methodologies strongly depending on envisaged flight tests at high speed can be grouped around the 6 major axes:* High-Speed Vehicle Concepts to assess the overall vehicle performance in terms of cruise-efficiency, range potential, aero-propulsive balance, aero-thermal-structural integration, etc...*…
  • Imperfect Malaria Vaccine can still help reduce Malaria cases by 36%

    2 May 2015 | 5:51 pm
    The world's first Malaria vaccine provides modest protection. Four injections of the RTS,S vaccine reduced cases of malaria in children aged 5 to 17 months and babies aged 6 to 12 weeks at first vaccination by 36 and 26 per cent respectively after four years, compared with non-recipients."Given that there were an estimated 198 million malaria cases in 2013, this level of efficacy potentially translates into millions of cases of malaria in children being prevented," says lead author Brian Greenwood of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Complete rollout of the…
  • US Startup X-energy developing innovative Xe-100 “pebble bed” high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    2 May 2015 | 4:56 pm
    X-energy, a Greenbelt-based nuclear engineering company,recently convened a group of world-renowned nuclear experts to discuss best-practices in pebble fuel fabrication. X-energy will use the spherical elements to fuel their Xe-100 gas-cooled nuclear reactor in the mid-2020s. The Xe-100 is a “pebble bed” high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR). The Xe-100 is a helium-cooled “pebble bed” HTGR that operates at 125MWth and produces approximately 48MWe.The Xe-100 will benefit from decades of research and safe operation in pebble bed reactors internationally, and X-energy plans to bring…
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    Boston Business News - Local Boston News | Boston Business Journal

  • Roboticist Helen Greiner unveils 'consumer-friendly' drone (BBJ photo gallery)

    Sara Castellanos
    4 May 2015 | 5:30 am
    Roboticist Helen Greiner, founder of Danvers-based robotics firm CyPhy Works, on Monday unveiled a crowdfunding campaign for her newest invention: a drone for the masses. The CyPhy LVL 1 Drone retails for about $500 on crowdfunding website Kickstarter, and Greiner aims to raise $250,000 by mid-June through the campaign. "We really have invented a better way for drones to fly," Greiner said in an interview. Features of the consumer drone include: allowing the user to set a maximum flying height,…
  • Salem's "ugliest building" sold

    4 May 2015 | 4:05 am
    A building the buyer and seller agree is the "ugliest" in Salem is poised to change hands, the Salem News reports. The paper says the home of the Red Lion smoke shop on Washington Street is one of the last downtown that hasn't been redeveloped.
  • Decades-old Northampton gift shop sold

    Laura Newberry
    4 May 2015 | 4:01 am
    Faces, the beloved gift shop that created a community stir when its owner announced its potential closing in January, has been sold and will maintain its quirky character. Colebrook Realty Services announced Sunday that the store has been purchased by Chris Andrew, Inc., a Longmeadow business group made up of Camile and Tiffany Hannoush, who own several retail businesses in the region, and Chris and Amy Pariseau. "We plan on keeping Faces 'as-is'," Camile Hannoush said of the store's future in…
  • Manufacturing plant heavily damaged in Sunday night fire

    Jeanette DeForge
    4 May 2015 | 3:58 am
    A fire that started in an exhaust vent at U.S. Tsubaki in Holyoke Sunday night spread to the roof of the building before firefighters could extinguish it. One firefighter was taken to the hospital after he started suffering from chest pains while fighting the stubborn fire. His condition was not known immediately, Fire Department Capt. Anthony Cerruti said. The fire was reported shortly before 8 p.m., by an employee who saw flames in the building at 821 Main St. Firefighters spent nearly three…
  • This banking giant wants a bigger piece of New England’s commercial lending pie

    Greg Ryan
    4 May 2015 | 3:47 am
    Wells Fargo & Co. is planning to significantly expand its commercial banking operations in New England over the next year. Prior to April 1, the bank (NYSE: WFC) had a Northeast commercial banking division headquartered in New York. Now, it has a stand-alone New England division, headquartered in Boston, that covers every state in the region except Connecticut. It has approximately $2.5 billion in total loan commitments from the commercial banking unit in New England, according to a spokeswoman. Greg…
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